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Gallagher & Dawsey Co., LPA is a unique intellectual property law firm whose practice includes intellectual property counseling and services to businesses and individual inventors, as well as other law firms, regarding patent, trademark, copyright, and trade secret issues.

Our experienced patent attorneys and trademark attorneys provide various intellectual property legal services such as patent searches, patent applications, trademark searches, trademark applications, copyright applications, infringement advice/opinions, and infringement litigation.

Complete our Request Form to receive one of our Free Brochures regarding protecting your intellectual property, or simply relax and receive an intellectual property education by watching the videos in our Online I.P. Video Library.

In today's information based society, the value of patents, trademarks, and copyrights has never been higher. Contact one of our patent lawyers or trademark lawyers to learn more about protecting your inventions, brands, and creative works.

The U.S. patent and trademark attorneys of Gallagher & Dawsey Co. LPA serve clients around the world from our Midwest offices. Our patent and trademark law firm has offices in Columbus, Dayton, and Cincinnati, Ohio.


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imageStudy finds that Non-Practicing Entities (NPE's) Cause Shift in Funding from R&D to Legal Departments: Researchers at Harvard and the University of Texas have published the results of their investigation into the damage NPE's inflict upon innovation. The study showed a direct link between reduced research and development (R&D) spending and revenues lost due to litigation cost. Researchers found that the activities of NPE's have resulted in companies increasing the size of their legal departments with funding that would have gone into R&D, thereby decreasing innovation.

imageSupreme Court Rules that Foreign Works can be Re-Copyrighted. In Golan v. Holder, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Congress did not exceed it’s authority by enacting legislation that removed lapsed foreign works from the public domain. Normally, when a work lapses into the public domain anyone is free to use the work without having to pay for the use. In 1994, in order to bring the United States in line with the Berne Convention, the U.S. Congress passed legislation that re-copyrighted foreign works whose copyright had lapsed in the United States but remained protected abroad. Prior to the passage of the legislation, millions of foreign works had lapsed into the public domain. The plaintiff in Golan claimed that the removal of works from the public domain infringed upon the rights of free speech. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg gave the opinion of the Court, stating "[n]either congressional practice nor our decisions treat the public domain, in any and all cases, as untouchable by copyright legislation. The First Amendment likewise provides no exceptional solicitude for works in the public domain." The Court declared that the harm caused by removing foreign works from the public domain was less important than the act of re-copyrighting foreign works to align U.S. copyright law with the Berne Convention.

image Fifth Circuit Appeals Court Affirms Sanctions against Plaintiff’s Attorney. The plaintiff, in Mick Haig Productions v. Does 1-670, probably thought that they had an unbeatable scheme for making money. The plaintiff sued 670 anonymous internet users for illegally downloading pornography. Unfortunate for the plaintiff, only the IP-addresses for the users were known. As a result, the plaintiff would use the court system to compel the discovery of the individual’s identities after which, the plaintiff, having no desire to actually litigate, would shame the accused downloaders into settling the case instead of risking public embarrassment. The lower court sanctioned the plaintiff’s attorney for violating Federal Rules of Civil Procedure 26 and 45 by issuing subpoenas to at least two Internet Service Providers even though the plaintiff’s motion to expedite discovery was still pending. The plaintiff’s attorney appealed the sanctions only to have the Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit affirm the sanctions.

image A Victory for Open Source Programming. In Oracle v. Google, Oracle was claiming that they owned the copyright to the Java Application Programming Interface (API) used by Google used in conjunction with the popular Android operating system. An API is a directory that allows various parts of a programming language to interface one another. Google chose to clone the Java API instead of using Oracle’s API. Oracle claimed that because Google’s API performed the same functionality as Oracle’s API, Google was guilty of copyright infringement. If Oracle’s claims prevailed it would have sent shockwaves through the open source community since such claims would not only be applicable to Java but all open source programming languages and programs derived from them. Fortunately for the open source community and Google, the Court ruled that computer language API’s could not be copyrighted. Judge Alsup stated, "to accept Oracle's claim would be to allow anyone to copyright one version of code to carry out a system of commands and thereby bar all others from writing their own different versions to carry out all or part of the same commands."

image Supreme Court Narrows Patentable Material Based On Laws of Nature: On March 20, 2012, the Supreme Court unanimously reversed the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit holding that Prometheus Laboratories’ patents were directed to non-statutory subject matter pursuant to 35 U.S.C. § 101 and therefore not patent-eligible. The Court held: "If a law of nature is not patentable then neither is a process reciting a law of nature, unless that process has additional features that provide practical assurance that the process is more than a drafting effort designed to monopolize the law of nature itself." A claim in the Prometheus patent applied a law of nature to quantify the relationships between the blood concentration of thiopurine metabolites and a drug’s effectiveness and harmful side effects. The Court found that the relationship between the presence of metabolites and the likelihood that the drug dosage will be effective or induce harmful side-effects actually "sets forth a natural law." As a result, the Court held that the claimed diagnostic method failed to transform an unpatentable law of nature into a patentable application of the law. Thus, whether the invention at issue is a method of medical treatment or a software-based business method the only sure path to patent-eligibility is to incorporate one or more elements, or steps, that are novel and nonobvious.

image Eolas Technologies’ Interactive Internet Claims Don’t Hold Water. In Eolas Technologies Inc. v. Adobe Systems Inc., Eolas was seeking approximately $600 million dollars for infringing the Eolas patents. Some of the companies included in the lawsuit as defendants were Adobe Systems, Amazon, CDW Corp., Google, JC Penney, Staples Inc., Yahoo, and YouTube. Eolas asserted that their patents (USPN 5,838,906 and USPN 7,599,985) covered the interactive aspects of online video, streaming music, image manipulation, and various search features. Unfortunately for Eolas, expert witness Tim Berners-Lee, who is credited for inventing the World Wide Web, presented prior art that predated the Eolas patent applications resulting in a jury finding the patents invalid.

image Supreme Court Rules that Foreign Works can be Re-Copyrighted. In Golan v. Holder, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Congress did not exceed it’s authority by enacting legislation that removed lapsed foreign works from the public domain. Normally, when a work lapses into the public domain anyone is free to use the work without having to pay for the use. In 1994, in order to bring the United States in line with the Berne Convention, the U.S. Congress passed legislation that re-copyrighted foreign works whose copyright had lapsed in the United States but remained protected abroad. Prior to the passage of the legislation, millions of foreign works had lapsed into the public domain. The plaintiff in Golan claimed that the removal of works from the public domain infringed upon the rights of free speech. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg gave the opinion of the Court, stating "[n]either congressional practice nor our decisions treat the public domain, in any and all cases, as untouchable by copyright legislation. The First Amendment likewise provides no exceptional solicitude for works in the public domain." The Court declared that the harm caused by removing foreign works from the public domain was less important than the act of re-copyrighting foreign works to align U.S. copyright law with the Berne Convention.

image American Invents Act Changes False Patent Marking Rules. The recently passed American Invents Act (AIA) has implemented many changes to the practice of patent law. One of these changes affects the enforcement and penalties associated with producing a product labeled with an expired, invalid or inapplicable patent. Prior to the passage of the AIA, a party that discovered an article marked with an expired, invalid or inapplicable patent could bring suit against the responsible marker and split the statutory penalty with the government. Under the old law, false marking was subject to a penalty of $500 “for every such offense.” Under the newly passed AIA, individuals can no longer bring suit against a company for falsely marking a product unless they suffered direct competitive injury as a result of the false marking. Further, a company that has suffered a direct competitive injury can only recover “actual damages,” which are generally difficult to prove. Additionally, prior to the AIA passage, marking a product with an expired patent number was a violation of patent law subject to a penalty. Now, the law no longer penalizes a manufacturer for failing to remove expired patent numbers from their products. Therefore, the new law has effectively eliminated the era of false marking vigilantes.

image Much More Already in Effect, with More to Come, in the America Invents Act. The AIA has changed, or will change, many long established laws and procedures in patent prosecution. Some of these include:

  • Effective now, a Small Entity can pay $2,400 ($4,800 for large entities) for expedited examination; with a patent office goal of wire to wire prosecution within 12 months. In the larger picture of the costs of patenting, this may represent a good value for many applicants.

  • Effective September 2012, for the first time, third parties will have an effective way to bring prior art to the attention of Examiners; potentially giving these third parties the means to block competitors’ applications.

  • Effective March, 2013, there will be a wide broadening of the definition of “prior art,” that will make more foreign sources count as patent-disqualifying prior art.

  • Also effective March, 2013, the United States will switch from being a “first to invent” to a “first to file” county, to conform to general world practice. This will greatly change the rules on who is entitled to a patent, and may greatly change traditional practices regarding Provisional Patent Applications and early filing.
Of course, the AIA is much more complex than can be expressed here. Please check with us anytime, and over the course of the next eighteen months, as we see how these changes will affect inventors everywhere.

image Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the War Between the Technology and Entertainment Industries. On October 28, 1998, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) was added to title 17 of the U.S. Code governing copyright. The purpose of the DMCA was to modify copyright law to cover loop holes in the law caused by the advancement of technology, such as the internet. Under the DMCA, internet service providers are provided a safe haven against liability for copyright infringement by their users, but must comply with a take down notice from a copyright holder.

Unfortunately for the entertainment industry, policing the internet for infringing material is costly and time consuming. As such, the entertainment industry has been lobbying Congress to pass the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), which would allow an online service provider’s entire domain of to be seized and shut down for infringing material uploaded by a user. Thereby, shifting the responsibility of policing for copyrighted works to the internet service provider.

In contrast, the technology industry is lobbying against the passage of SOPA. The enactment of SOPA would impose drastic changes on online service providers, and will cause some to shut down. For instance, as SOPA is currently written, the YouTube domain could be seized and shut down if a user posts an unauthorized work. Furthermore, leaders in the technology industry claim that SOPA has the potential of drastically changing the internet as we know it, which will affect search engines, websites, forums, and blogs.

image Copyright Holding Company Righthaven LLC Ordered to Pay $120,000 in Attorney Fees and Court Costs. According the U.S. District Court of Nevada in Righthaven v. Thomas DiBiase, copyright holding company Righthaven LLC tried to shake down and force Thomas DiBiase into a settlement. Thomas DiBiase was running a website that aided in missing body murder cases, and used information found in a story in the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Righthaven claimed ownership of the copyrighted material and threatened to sue DiBiase. Unfortunately for Righthaven, DiBiase decided to not to settle and put up a fight. At trial, DiBiase claimed that the use of the material from the Las Vegas Review-Journal fell under the fair use exemption because the website was non-profit in nature and aided law enforcement. Interesting enough, the judge did not rule on the fair use claims but rather dismissed the case for lack of subject matter jurisdiction. It turns out that Righthaven never owned the copyrights that they claimed ownership in, and did not have a right to seize DiBiase’s website. Furthermore, the judge ruled that Righthaven violated Civil Procedure Rule 11(b) by filing a frivolous lawsuit without merit. As a result, Righthaven was ordered to pay all fees requested by DiBiase, a sum total of approximately $120,000.

image “Exceptional” Case Finding Requires Patent Holding Company Plaintiff to Reimburse Defense Costs: In Eon-Net LP v. Flagstar Bancorp (Fed. Cir. 2011), Eon-Net, a patent holding company, sued Flagstar, claiming that Flagstar violated Eon-Net’s patent. Flagstar’s website gave customers the option of applying for a loan online, while Eon-Net’s patent claimed an "information processing system for inputting information from a document or file on a computer into at least one application program . . .," and specified the limitation "hard copy" over a hundred times. Because Flagstar’s paper-free website was clearly outside of the boundaries of Eon-Net’s patent claims, the court issued a summary judgment for defendant and awarded costs and misconduct sanctions against Eon-Net’s counsel and his law firm. The court found that the lawsuit was sufficiently "exceptional" under 35 U.S.C. § 285 to reject the usual rule that each side pays its own legal expenses, and to justify reimbursement for the defendants for their unwarranted expenses. The court, subsequently upheld on appeal, ordered Eon-Net to pay Flagstar $631,134 in defense expenses and misconduct sanctions against Eon-Net’s lawyers. The Court, faulting Eon-Net’s lack of pre-suit investigation and failure to specify any plausible infringement, reminds patent holders of the need for a careful analysis of allegedly infringing products and the necessity of pleading at least a basically well-documented case of infringement.



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image Looking for some last minute holiday gift ideas? You’re in luck! The patent attorneys at Gallagher & Dawsey have added some content to our Interesting Patents page that should give you some gift giving inspiration. First, don’t be put off by the rather generic sounding name. The toy that this "Toy and Process of Use" patent is directed to will appeal to the most nostalgic person on your list (especially if they have stairs in their home). Next, the patent for this toy issued in 1961, but it’s just as popular today. Check out the patent directed to the "Toy Building Brick", better known as Lego toy building bricks. Finally, if there’s always that one person at your holiday gathering that tends to annoy the whole group, give them a dose of their own medicine with the "Skin-Irritating Game Machine." They might just take the hint.

imageOn October 17th intellectual property attorney David J. Dawsey had the pleasure of being a guest on the nationally syndicated The Small Business Advocate® radio program with Jim Blasingame to discuss how edgy trademarks are good, while disparaging trademarks are bad (in light of the well publicized Washington Redskins issues), as well as the Supreme Court’s view on patenting of abstract ideas and the impact on small businesses. Click here to listen.

imageThis month the patents attorneys at Gallagher & Dawsey are dedicating some space on our Interesting Patents page to inventors who must have had the best intentions for their children’s well-being and emotional development when designing these baby-related patents. First, if you don’t believe in “helicopter parenting,” this "Baby Patting Machine" patent does all the hard work of patting your baby’s butt while you catch some sleep. Next, some people take their restless babies for a ride in the car to soothe them to sleep, so why not try strapping that crying child on your horse and going for a gallop? The "Infant Bed for Use on Horseback" invention allows you to do just that. Finally, if you’re the type who’s mortified when your family shows your baby pictures, you may need therapy after mom proudly displays your childhood with this "Infant Mannequin" invention.

imageDon’t leave your dog out of the upcoming Halloween festivities! This month our Columbus IP lawyers have added new content to the Interesting Patents page including three design patents assigned to Target Brands, Inc. for pet costumes. If your dog is the adventurous type, he may enjoy this airplane shaped Pet Costume patent. If your dog enjoys riding in cars, he might enjoy wearing one, like this car shaped Pet Costume patent. Finally, if your dog is more of the laid back surfer type, or would like to be, this surfer themed Pet Costume patent may be the perfect fit.

image This month our Columbus IP lawyers have added new content to the Interesting Patents page including inventions that would be right at home in a science fiction movie! First, try to imagine a "silent subliminal presentation system" that uses very low or very high audio frequency for silent communication. Next, can you imagine a quiet airport? The U.S. Navy is researching, and patenting, ways to cancel airport noise as evidenced by their patent for a "wide area noise cancellation system and method."

imageMany people are hitting lakes and rivers to beat the summer heat. This month, the patent attorneys at Gallagher & Dawsey have added new boat related patents to our Interesting Patents page. First, a patent from 1920 is directed to a "Combined Automobile and Motor Boat" that allows you to drive your boat to (and into) the lake. Next, a "Traction Boat" patent is another early example of an amphibious vehicle. Lastly, less than 10 years after the RMS Titanic sank, a patent issued that is directed to an "Unsinkable Boat."

image At this year's FIFA World Cup™ there seems to be a lot of buzz about balls. So this month, the patent lawyers at Gallagher & Dawsey added new soccer ball patent content, both past and present, to our Interesting Patents page. First, the 1928 patent for "Lacing for Soccer Footballs" demonstrates an early attempt to improve speed and accuracy. Next, a "Soccer Ball" patent that issued in 1989 features star shaped panels. Lastly, a recent soccer ball design patent, assigned to adidas AG, may look familiar to those who are following the 2014 World Cup™.

image In a few short weeks, the U.S. will be celebrating our independence with parades and fireworks. To mark the occasion, our patent attorneys have added new 4th of July content to our interesting patents page! This month we've added a patent for a "Whirling Sparkler,"an interesting alternative to the familiar July 4th novelty. Do you want to participate in your town's July 4th parade, but don’t own a float? Is your car far too fuel efficient? A possible solution to both problems is found in a patent titled "Foundation Frame for Parade Floats.". Finally, don’t let your lunch wander off while waiting for the fireworks! A patent titled "Anti-theft Picnic Device" will help protect your picnic from thieves.

image It's spring here in Ohio and our patent attorneys have added fresh new content to our Interesting Patents page! This month we dug up some interesting plant patents. First is a patent for a Pulmonaria plant named "Dark Vader". Next, is a Sedum plant named "Jaws". Finally, a patent for a Heuchera plant named "Gotham". Love the names!

image Science fiction fans might enjoy the newest content in our Interesting Patents page! This month, our patent attorneys have added inventions that seem to be right out of a futuristic novel. First is a patent from 1930 entitled "Apparatus for Obtaining Criminal Confessions and Photographically Recording Them." Next, is the "Cloaking System Using Optoelectronically Controlled Camouflage." Finally, a published patent application "Coupling An Electronic Skin Tattoo To A Mobile Communication Device."

image Magicians never give up their tricks; unless they want to patent the tools of a magician's trade. This month, our Ohio IP attorneys have added content to our Interesting Patents page that is related to magical illusions. First, the "Illusion Apparatus," patented in 1921, provided the impression of a disembodied head in a basket. Next, a patent from 1923 covered an "Illusion Device," which was one way to perform the classic magic trick of cutting a person in half. Lastly, in 1936 E.M. Massey's variation of the "cut a lady in half" illusion was patented under the title "Theatrical Illusion."

image It’s February, and here in Ohio, that means several more weeks of unpredictable winter weather. This month, our patent lawyers have added content to our Interesting Patents page that includes some creative ways to beat the cold. First up is a patented "Snow Cycle" invention designed to help you get you to your destination no matter what the weather. Next, if you do find yourself cycling in the winter, the battery powered "Cold Weather Shoe" invention will keep your feet comfortable. Finally, you have transport, your feet are warm, you might as well head over to a patented "All-Weather Golf Driving Range".

image On December 20th intellectual property attorney David J. Dawsey had the pleasure of being a guest on the nationally syndicated The Small Business Advocate® radio program with Jim Blasingame to discuss copyright fair use and the Google Books case. Click here to listen.

image Feeling frumpy? What better way to kick the winter blues than with a spa day? This month, our intellectual property attorneys have added content to our Interesting Patents page that includes some interesting beauty treatments to help you out of a winter slump. First up is an adhesive "Wrinkle Remover" patent from 1917! If that doesn't suit your fancy how about a "Beauty Mask" patent from 1932 that seems to function as a facial stencil. Finally, a more recent beauty treatment invention uses ozone, as disclosed in a patent for "Apparatus For Producing Ozone Gas For Beauty Treatment", which issued in 2005.

imageDo you spend a lot of time in your car? Perhaps you’ve considered making your commute more pleasant by bringing some of the comforts of home on the road with you. If so, check out our Interesting Patents page, where our intellectual property attorneys have added patents that are directed to gadgets for our cars. For example, the "In-Car Coffee Maker" invention will save you a side trip to the coffee shop by allowing you to brew on the go. Additionally, the next time you’re heading out for a formal occasion, be certain that your car is looking the part by applying this "Headlight Accessory" invention. Finally, stay well hydrated while driving with the patented "In-Car Hydration Systems".

imagePatent lawyer David Dawsey has been selected to Chair a subcommittee of the ABA IP Section’s USPTO Operations Relating to Patents (Ex-Parte Practice) Committee. The subcommittee will focus on the interpretation of 35 U.S.C. 102(a) and 102(b) rejections and will follow case holdings, rejection trends, and MPEP guidelines.

imageWhat would we do without our portable devices? This month, our intellectual property attorneys have added patents to our Interesting Patents page that are directed to portable phones over the decades. As early as 1920, assignee Western Electric was granted a patent for a "Portable Telephone Set." Then if you were a power broker in the 80’s the Motorola design patent titled "Portable Telephone or Similar Article" may look familiar. Lastly, a recent design patent for an "Electronic Device" is a great example of the simple designs and clean lines that assignee, Apple, Inc., has become known for.

imageThe dog days of summer are dwindling away here in Ohio, but there are plenty of interesting, dog-related patents on our Interesting Patents page to keep animal lovers amused over the coming autumn months. In 1920 H.L. Stoker was issued a patent for his "Dog Muzzle" which only becomes restrictive if the dog wearing it becomes aggressive. Although not an issued patent, a patent application published for an invention titled "Dog Nose Art", which discloses an interesting way for your dog to express himself artistically. More recently a patent issued for an ingenious "Drool Stopper Dog Bowl" that should be popular with owners of dogs who are messy drinkers.

image Our patent and trademark attorneys are very proud of the work we perform for our clients. Please check out some of our recent patent, trademark, and litigation projects.

imageIP attorney David Dawsey has assumed the position of Intake Editor of Landslide® magazine, the flagship publication of the Intellectual Property Law Section of the ABA. Landslide® magazine is a bi-monthly publication that offers news and analysis on patents, trademarks, copyrights and related topics, written by and for an audience of intellectual property lawyers. The magazine covers this rapidly evolving legal specialization through an emphasis that includes business, technology, the arts, legislation and international developments. David has also been selected to serve as a member of the CLE Board of the American Bar Association Section of Intellectual Property Law.

imageOur Ohio patent prosecution lawyers have added new content to our Interesting Patents page. Everyone has their ups and downs," but the inventors of these amusement rides may have had more than most. A patent from 1869 is directed to an "Artificial Sliding Hill" and describes an invention "through which the public will be afforded a delightful and desirable winter amusement." Fifteen years later a patent issued directed to an early "Roller Coasting Device." Star Wars fans will recognize the vehicles in the drawings of this 2010 patent for a "Multi-Track Multi-Vehicle Roller Coaster With Special Effects."

imageOn July 22nd IP lawyer David J. Dawsey had the pleasure of being a guest on the nationally syndicated The Small Business Advocate® radio program with Jim Blasingame to discuss steps for small businesses to create an intellectual property strategy. Click here to listen.

imageThis month our Columbus IP lawyers have updated the Interesting Patents page with new weird and wacky patents. First, can you guess how many patent attorneys does it take to change a light bulb? Answer: None, if you have this "Light Bulb Changer" invention. Next, are you looking to liven up a dull musical performance? Trumpet players may be interested in this "Musical Instrument Adapted to Emit a Controlled Flame" invention. Lastly, you may not be able to send an email from these glasses, but before Google Glass there was an invention titled "Glasses With Subliminal Message" to improve your outlook on the world.

imageThis month our Ohio patent attorneys have updated the Interesting Patents page with a few patents that have been making news recently. Two patents owned by Myriad Genetics, Inc. are directed to identifying and isolating the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, which can be linked to predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer. The corporation Monsanto also owns patents that have been making news. One example is their patent for "Glyphosate Tolerant Plants," which are genetically modified to be tolerant of another one of their products, the herbicide Roundup®.

imageThis month our Ohio patent litigation attorneys tip their hats to the inventors of some interesting head wear. In 1916, A.B. Pratt was granted the patent for his invention simply titled "weapon", which covers a firearm that is built into a helmet. In contrast, the invention titled "Combination Pillow and Crash Helmet" seems a little more relaxing to wear. Lastly, a patent from 1923 for "Novelty Headwear" appears to be an early version of the iconic paper hat worn by fast food workers across the country.

imageOur patent prosecution attorneys have updated the "Historic Patents" section of our website to include some interesting U.S. patents for early office supplies. Imagine the chaos within your office without the humble push pin! This early push pin patent issued in 1914 direct to an angled push pin. Our patent lawyers have also added this patent from 1932 simply titled "Calculating Machine;" as well as a "pencil and eraser" patent from 1858!

imageMarch is Women's History Month in the U.S., so this month, weve updated the "Historic Patents" section of our website to honor some of the innovative ladies who've been issued U.S. patents. In 1903, Mary Anderson developed a solution to the new problem of driving a car in the rain. Her "Window Cleaning Device" was an early windshield wiper. Patsy Sherman developed "Block and Graft Copolymers Containing Water-Solvatable Polar Groups and Fluoroaliphatic Groups" while attempting to develop a new kind of rubber for jet aircraft fuel lines. Her invention later became known as Scotchgard. In addition to being an author and speaker on the topic of autism, Dr. Temple Grandin is also an authority on livestock behavior and humane slaughter techniques. Her invention, "Animal Stunning System Prior to Slaughter," is just one of the many contributions she has made to the development of more humane livestock handling facilities.

imageThis month the IP lawyers at Gallagher & Dawsey have added new, pet related content to the "Patents for Your Pets” section of our "Interesting Patents" page. First, we have the "Bird Trap and Cat Feeder" patent. This invention was meant to kill two birds with one stone: reduce the sparrow population, and keep the neighborhood cats well fed. Next, we have the "Apparatus for Determining Dog's Emotions by Vocal Analysis of Barking Sounds and Method for the Same" patent. This invention claims to determine the emotions of a dog by analyzing barking sounds. In the event this invention doesn't let you know when your dog is feeling frustrated, we have the "Flush Toilet for a Dog" patent. Now your dog can take over your bathroom as well as your couch.

imageThis month, the patent attorneys at Gallagher and Dawsey Co. LPA have jumped on the celebrity inventor bandwagon and have added new celebrity patents to the Interesting Patents section of the website. You won't need Radar to catch fish with this "Enhanced Fish Attractor Device" patent granted to a cast member of the M.A.S.H. television show. Chapped lips? This "winning" invention titled "Chapstick Dispensing Apparatus" by Carlos Irwin Estevez, a.k.a. Charlie Sheen, may be just what you need. Lastly, it's no myth that myth-buster Jamie Hyneman was granted a patent in 2002 for his invention titled "Remote Control Device With Gyroscopic Stabilization and Directional Control.

imageIn the spirit of Thanksgiving, we are highlighting a couple of trademarks this month. What would Thanksgiving morning be without "Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade"? That phrase became a registered mark in 1998 after being in use since 1924. To continue with our Thanksgiving theme, the patent lawyers at Gallagher & Dawsey have added new content to the Interesting Patents page, which includes a "Poultry Frying Apparatus" and a "Turkey Decoy." For those of you who enjoy hunting and cooking your own turkey, this "Poultry Frying Apparatus," or this "Turkey Decoy" may come in handy!

image It's almost Halloween again, so to celebrate our Ohio patent attorneys have added Halloween themed patents to the Historic Patents section of the website. This patent for a "Jack-A-Lantern", issued in 1889, is not carved from a pumpkin, but is just as creepy! If you do prefer your Halloween décor to be made from pumpkins, check out the patent for "Forming Configurations On Natural Growth." Finally, a 1914 design patent for a "Paper Sheet or Similar Article" might appeal to those who find other Halloween décor too scary.

image Here in Ohio another summer is coming to a close and the daylight hours are getting shorter. As a farewell to the long summer days, the IP lawyers at Gallagher & Dawsey have added patents for solar powered inventions to the Interesting Patents section of our website. Outdoorsmen and women may be interested in a patent covering a "Container for Purifying Water by Utilization of Sunlight," perhaps a "Solar Powered Bird Feeder," or a "Solar Powered Mouse."


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